Unfortunately, as teens form their first romantic relationships, they often are unclear about what constitutes a healthy relationship.

This can lead to serious injuries, and sadly, sometimes death.

A person with high self-esteem can also be affected by dating violence, but generally, someone with high self-esteem will be more empowered to leave a relationship that is marked with a high degree of controlling and abusive behavior.

Outcome measures were reported at Wave 3, and included depressive symptomatology, self-esteem, antisocial behaviors, sexual risk behaviors, extreme weight control behaviors, suicidal ideation and attempt, substance use (smoking, heavy episodic drinking, marijuana, other drugs), and adult intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization.

Data were analyzed by using multivariate linear and logistic regression models.

We consulted with girls around the world to better understand their personal obstacles.

These girls reported, overwhelmingly, multiple challenges and sources of stress—violence, dating, peer pressure, depression, lack of self-esteem, and family or cultural expectations.

The action goals are simple: educate teenagers, parents and school personnel about teenage dating violence; promote an understanding of healthy vs.

unhealthy relationships; and provide programs to empower girls— Learn More about Dream it Be it Infographic: Teen Dating Violence Love shouldn't hurt.

Dating partners with lower self-esteem have a tendency to stay in abusive dating relationships.