All machines in the 27 series (VS-1, VS-2, VS-3, 27, 28, 127, and 128) have the following distinguishing characteristics that can be used to differentiate them from other Singer machines: The design of the model 27 series began with Allen B.Wilson, who invented the vibrating shuttle in 1850 and sold machines built around it.(The 27 and the 127 were full-size versions of the Singer 28 and later model 128 which were three-quarter size).

In November 1944 Singer applied for a patent that relates to sewing machines and it has a primary objective to provide an improved sewing machine which will afford better visibility at the stitching point.

The needle-bar and the presser-bar are inclined rearward between eight and sixteen degrees to a vertical plane.

There is a lesser possibility that it could be the Model 191 or 206 but they can be identified at the same location and only one design was used on these machines.

The Singer Model 27 and later model 127 were a series of lockstitch sewing machines produced by the Singer Manufacturing Company from the 1880s to the 1960s.

The "White Sewing Machine", as it was first named, entered production in 1876.

It was popular in its time, and some of them remain. He then designed the sewing machine which would shortly become Singer's answer to the White machine.

I can't help you with repair, parts or dating or giving you an estimate on the value of your machine.

I can not answer emails asking what your machine is worth or how old it is.

The inclined needle bar would become known as the "Slant-Needle" but engineering of this new machine would continue and included another patent that improved the balancing of the rotary hook for the purpose of reducing vibration. An imaginary plane of reference, A-B-C, controls the bed casting.