APPRAISER: Okay, actually, what it is, is it's a tea caddy. APPRAISER: And this would have been made in England in the early part of the 19th century, made about 1800, 1810. APPRAISER: Well, at auction, how does ,000 strike you? Value can change: The value of an item is dependent upon many things, including the condition of the object itself, trends in the market for that kind of object, and the location where the item will be sold.

It would be called a Regency tea caddy, and they made it in the shape of a pear, and they made other tea caddies in the form of other fruit. Given that it's shaped like a pear, what do you think it's made of? APPRAISER: That's a very good guess, and that's exactly right. These are just some of the reasons why the answer to the question "What's it worth?

dating antique tea caddies-23

Dating antique tea caddies dating the first australians

During the tea boom of the 18th century, tea leaves - a precious cargo which had travelled thousands of miles before arriving in the UK - were worth their weight in gold.

Therefore it was only fitting that the expensive cargo should be stored somewhere special on arrival.

The antique tea caddy spoon, once one of the most fashionable items in an 18th-century home, is now a popular collectible among antique lovers.

These short, squat spoons used to be an important and useful accoutrement for wealthy ladies and gentlemen who practiced a daily tea ritual in their household.

Today, tea bags are likely to be stored in the box they came in.

But when tea was first available in the UK, Alex Fullerton finds that intricate and expensive tea caddies were the only way to keep the leaves.

APPRAISER: Now, you had said that you just considered it what? Now, that is called a finial, and if you were staring at a pear, would you expect to see an acorn on top? That is something that all the old ones have that the new ones do not. Stuart Whitehurst, who originally appraised this object, was unavailable.

GUEST: A box, a pear box, is what I've always called it. Tea was extremely valuable during this time period, so if you had this set up on a sideboard, you didn't want anybody coming in and sort of going, "Well, I think I'll help myself to a couple of spoonfuls of tea here." And they were a terrific form-- nice, whimsical, fun form that people had. So if anybody out there is ever looking to see if they have an authentic one, look for that plug. GUEST: Well, I thought if it was worth or 0, I'd be thrilled. Current Appraised Value:

But when tea was first available in the UK, Alex Fullerton finds that intricate and expensive tea caddies were the only way to keep the leaves.APPRAISER: Now, you had said that you just considered it what? Now, that is called a finial, and if you were staring at a pear, would you expect to see an acorn on top? That is something that all the old ones have that the new ones do not. Stuart Whitehurst, who originally appraised this object, was unavailable.GUEST: A box, a pear box, is what I've always called it. Tea was extremely valuable during this time period, so if you had this set up on a sideboard, you didn't want anybody coming in and sort of going, "Well, I think I'll help myself to a couple of spoonfuls of tea here." And they were a terrific form-- nice, whimsical, fun form that people had. So if anybody out there is ever looking to see if they have an authentic one, look for that plug. GUEST: Well, I thought if it was worth $80 or $100, I'd be thrilled. Current Appraised Value: $1,500 (Decreased) Executive producer Marsha Bemko shares her tips for getting the most out of ANTIQUES ROADSHOW.With sliding top and lift off cap which doubles as a tea measure. 1770 SAMUEL WOOD (c.1704-1794) Price £2,850 An elegant pair of antique sterling silver tea boxes of plain serpentine form having gadroon borders and cast leaf scroll feet and ornaments. Tea caddies were the ultimate solution and with their ornate and intricate decoration they became a fitting home for the exotic leaves.

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But when tea was first available in the UK, Alex Fullerton finds that intricate and expensive tea caddies were the only way to keep the leaves.

APPRAISER: Now, you had said that you just considered it what? Now, that is called a finial, and if you were staring at a pear, would you expect to see an acorn on top? That is something that all the old ones have that the new ones do not. Stuart Whitehurst, who originally appraised this object, was unavailable.

GUEST: A box, a pear box, is what I've always called it. Tea was extremely valuable during this time period, so if you had this set up on a sideboard, you didn't want anybody coming in and sort of going, "Well, I think I'll help myself to a couple of spoonfuls of tea here." And they were a terrific form-- nice, whimsical, fun form that people had. So if anybody out there is ever looking to see if they have an authentic one, look for that plug. GUEST: Well, I thought if it was worth $80 or $100, I'd be thrilled. Current Appraised Value: $1,500 (Decreased) Executive producer Marsha Bemko shares her tips for getting the most out of ANTIQUES ROADSHOW.

With sliding top and lift off cap which doubles as a tea measure.

1770 SAMUEL WOOD (c.1704-1794) Price £2,850 An elegant pair of antique sterling silver tea boxes of plain serpentine form having gadroon borders and cast leaf scroll feet and ornaments.

Tea caddies were the ultimate solution and with their ornate and intricate decoration they became a fitting home for the exotic leaves.

||

But when tea was first available in the UK, Alex Fullerton finds that intricate and expensive tea caddies were the only way to keep the leaves.

APPRAISER: Now, you had said that you just considered it what? Now, that is called a finial, and if you were staring at a pear, would you expect to see an acorn on top? That is something that all the old ones have that the new ones do not. Stuart Whitehurst, who originally appraised this object, was unavailable.

GUEST: A box, a pear box, is what I've always called it. Tea was extremely valuable during this time period, so if you had this set up on a sideboard, you didn't want anybody coming in and sort of going, "Well, I think I'll help myself to a couple of spoonfuls of tea here." And they were a terrific form-- nice, whimsical, fun form that people had. So if anybody out there is ever looking to see if they have an authentic one, look for that plug. GUEST: Well, I thought if it was worth $80 or $100, I'd be thrilled. Current Appraised Value: $1,500 (Decreased) Executive producer Marsha Bemko shares her tips for getting the most out of ANTIQUES ROADSHOW.

With sliding top and lift off cap which doubles as a tea measure.

,500 (Decreased) Executive producer Marsha Bemko shares her tips for getting the most out of ANTIQUES ROADSHOW.

With sliding top and lift off cap which doubles as a tea measure.

1770 SAMUEL WOOD (c.1704-1794) Price £2,850 An elegant pair of antique sterling silver tea boxes of plain serpentine form having gadroon borders and cast leaf scroll feet and ornaments.

Tea caddies were the ultimate solution and with their ornate and intricate decoration they became a fitting home for the exotic leaves.