My 10 year old daughter's number one follower is a grown adult male stranger.

Unfortunately because she lives in another state with her dad I have no say over the matter.

First, the basics: Snapchat Stories are collections of photos and short videos that your friends (and any brands you might connect with) publish to the app. Anything published to Stories is given a lifespan of 24 hours, and Snapchat is capable of stitching multiple pieces of content together into a single story.

To view a story, you simply tap the circle next to your friend's name, or their name itself.

) And finally, to the adults reading this to discover what they've been missing: Apologies, but Snapchat will show you things—like what you'd look like as a glasses-wearing chihuahua—that you'll never unsee.

And with a rotating set of fun features and filters, it's also the response to Facebook and Twitter's stale experiences.

As with any social network, much of your Snapchat experience will depend on who you follow, but on this one you're less likely to find carefully composed posts.

Instead, Snapchat all about spontaneity and documenting things "in the now." Or, as the company's founder Evan Spiegel puts it, "instant expression."Navigating the App When opening Snapchat, forget the infinite scroll of the social networks you're used to, because this app immediately springboards the camera to the screen.

Bullying /Trolling/Spaming broadcasts are not addressed. No safety Measures Address for would be Broadcaster's.

The kids love it and it's great to give them self confidence and what not.

But, the concern of not being able to control who views you worries me.

I think that if a kid is going to use this then we should be able to approve the viewers.

My main gripe with Snapchat: I had few friends on the platform, and I didn't want to send disappearing selfies to any of them. And when I did want to send images to a friend, I used SMS or Whats App. Here's what I learned: Pick up the pieces of your mind from the floor and listen up.